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EDITORIAL
PHILOSOPHY

A guiding principle of Living Superior Magazine’s content is keeping a good-humored, relaxed tone, one that is both conversational and informative. We are in essence a virtual lake community, and like our tagline says, “life is better on the lake.”

 

That starts with our tone and mindset. We aspire to a friendlier, more civilized community apart from the hostilities of the outside world, social media squabbling, and fashionable political stances.

Principally, Living Superior serves apolitical readers, who we believe are underserved in today’s media marketplace. One by one, we see American media institutions getting sucked into divisive political debates and “us vs. them” stances. While our company supports causes that make sense for our brand, such as rights for boaters and hunters, support of military veterans and law enforcement, and preserving American ideals, we are not explicitly political in our content.

 

Living Superior does not intend to make enemies, and at the same time, we will not be pressured to ally ourselves with fashionable causes that alienate us from our readership. Needless to say, there will be no open letters, petitions, or political endorsements in the pages of Living Superior Magazine.

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Submit, sit back, and let us handle the rest.

 

When you turn your story over to us, you must let it go. These aren’t toddlers being left at a daycare, but the beginning of a collaboration. You have done your part once you submit to us. We’ll let you know if we have any questions. If after we receive your article, we decide to loosen its necktie or let down its hair, it’s in the interest of maintaining a consistent, readerly tone.

 

Sure, sometimes we will offend someone’s idea of perfect grammar. “To boldly go where no man has gone before” is better than “To go boldly . . .” despite what your third-grade schoolmarm told you about splitting infinitives. If we decide to dangle a participle, it is in the interest of keeping our style consistently loose, relaxed, and reader friendly. These aren’t research papers. These are conversations with a laid-back audience of lake dwellers. Listen to how they speak and communicate when they are away from their desks, out of the city, and in wild among their people, and write like that. We must put aside our grammar police instincts sometimes and trust our ear as to what “sounds right,” and what sounds right is the way people naturally speak.

 

If that sounds too loose to you, maybe you are better suited for one of those uptight publications that mixes highbrow gravitas with urbane musings and trendy politics. We suggest you submit your articles to the Atlantic or the New Yorker. We are a magazine meant to be read by living, breathing humans, not academia or Beltway think tanks.